My First Query Submission Experience (and what I learnt from it)!

I submitted my first ever query to an agent on Sunday (4th)! Like the physical submission of my manuscript that I done at the beginning of the year, it feels like it has not reached the person it was meant to. Does everyone feel that way? Obviously it’s just a symptom of my paranoia.

I had written out my query letters for various agents a while ago, but only recently have I begun the process of actually sending them, partially because I’m still editing my manuscript, but mostly because I was just anxious about it.

I realise now though that I kind of like the fact I left it until December. Considering my first manuscript submission was back in January, this feels like a cool way to round off the year by submitting my first query at the end.

During my time trying to create these queries, I learnt something quite useful.

I learnt how to explain my story in a condensed fashion. It was difficult at first, because whilst I’m actually okay at writing a synopsis in most instances, this story is… well, it’s basically (in my eyes) the flagship series, the one I hope to define my ‘writing persona’ of all my possible works. So my difficulty to explain it, comes not only from it’s complex nature, but also from my desire to try and describe it in the perfect way.

This is probably something most writers do, and why they struggle with synopsis’, and I’d even say info-dumps. It stems from a desire to create this picture-perfect understanding of your world and ideas.

But then, I came to realise, and accept, that not everybody is going to interpret your work in the same way you do, and there’s literally nothing you can do about that. Even in a visual medium such as film, television or comics, people interpret different gestures and things of that nature, in various ways.

Of course, it is important to be as clear and accurate as possible when explaining your story, especially to an agent/editor, and for me, I’d say it’s paramount said agent/editor understands the vision behind the work at the very least, and at best, they wish to push for it with equal passion.

But at the same time, you must accept that there will never be any one, true view of how your work is. Even you, as you age, may interpret your work in a different light to the one you currently do. I mean, I can imagine looking back on my current stuff and saying: “That kid had some great ideas, but man was he bold.”

I know I probably will, because I already have with the older versions of this same story. There was some real cringe-inducing material in some of those old outlines, and my first draft. And bare in mind, a lot of that was only made a year or two ago.

A good sign of my growth to be sure, but also a reminder that your views on things can change drastically in relatively short periods, so long as you keep an open mind (which I think is a necessity as a creator). Ideas I once thought to be genre-shifting, are now being swept under the carpet for fear of being brought to light. And believe me, we don’t want some of those things brought to light.

That’s just a little insight I got from this experience. The next move now is to send out my other queries to the other agents on my list, and to bring my story into beta.

This post went on a bit longer than I originally intended, but for many of us fantasy writers, such is the way of things.

Expect me to be documenting things a bit more on here as time goes on (I really should have done that from the beginning).

Anyway, that’s all I’ve got to say, and I’m out peace!


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